UWA Business School Blog Hub

Research Blog

Professor Rod Tyres

In Alan Kohler’s insightful article in the Weekend Australian, 15-16 April, p 23, links are drawn between the “low interest rate policies” of the advanced countries’ central banks, debt accumulation, low productivity and wealth inequality. While I am certain these links are valid, they are subtle and multi-faceted and so warrant some expansion.

Central to understanding them is the post-GFC transformation of central banking in the advanced economies. These central banks once managed portfolios of assets that amounted to little more than a twentieth of their nations’ GDP levels, and these were used solely to trade in, and thereby control, yields only on short maturity government debt. Such debt instruments tend not to be traded abroad or, indeed, by any but the major financial institutions within a country. The modest balance sheets had therefore been sufficient to manage the domestic money supply and, more particularly, the inflation rate, throughout the “great moderation” since 1990.

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Family business has a hybrid identity – that is, it combines the family with the business and, while sometimes this doesn’t work out well, most of the time it does. The 70% of businesses in Australia that are family businesses say so!

But in this changing environment, family businesses have to become as agile as any other business. Agility is not just about business agility but includes emotional agility.

Emotional agility is about developing a positivity to manage that includes being optimistic and confident about the future, building resilience, but importantly, developing grit or a determination to wade through the challenges.

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Dr Michael Jetter, UWA Business School

Media organisations need to find better ways of covering terrorism events, argues the UWA Business School’s Dr Michael Jetter.

1. being murdered,
2. dying,
3. not finding or losing a job,
4. the education of their children and
5. a war involving their country.

In the United States, almost half of the population is worried they or their family would fall victim to a terrorist attack. In reality, however, the odds of dying at the hands of a terrorist are approximately equal to the likelihood of drowning in your own bathtub. Then why are we so worried about terrorism?

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Violetta Wilk, 2nd Year Marketing Ph.D. Candidate at UWA Business School

Those of us who are members of online communities would agree that these are information rich and extremely valuable consumer-to-consumer (C2C) communication platforms where we, the consumers, have the power to exchange information about brands and thus co-create brands online. One way we like to share our brand insights is by way of positive brand mentions within online discussion forums of the communities we belong to. So, which positive brand mentions are, in effect, online brand advocacy (OBA)? Well, the definition for online brand advocacy is unaccounted for in academic literature and in marketing practice, creating confusion and highlighting a clear gap which my research endeavours to address.

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Stanley Yu - Marketing PhD candidate, UWA Business School

Consumer decision-making is a complex process, and information search has been identified as one of the most important stages which may ultimately influence a purchasing decision. Most of the reported studies on information search focus on western consumers, whereas little research attention has been paid to consumers in other cultures, and even less research has examined the relationship between culture and information search. Negative information is prevalent in today’s marketplace and may cause detrimental consequences on the affected brands. It is very interesting to bridge a number of research gaps by investigating Australian and Chinese consumer’s intentions to search information under the exposure of negative information.

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